GAO Makes Appointments to Health Information Technology Advisory Committee

WASHINGTON, D.C. (August 3, 2017) — Gene L. Dodaro, Comptroller General of the United States and head of the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), today announced 15 appointments to the new Health Information Technology (HIT) Advisory Committee.

“It is extremely valuable to have a range of perspectives and expertise in helping the government address challenges related to health information technology,” Dodaro said. “GAO received nominations for many highly qualified individuals, and I’m pleased to announce this first round of appointments to the HIT Advisory Committee.”

Newly appointed members will serve for one-, two-, or three-year terms. All members may be reappointed for subsequent three-year terms. Members appointed for one-year terms are Michael Adcock, Terrence O’Malley, Carolyn Petersen, Sasha TerMaat, and Andrew Truscott. Members appointed for two-year terms are John Kansky, Denni McColm, Brett Oliver, Raj Ratwani, and Denise Webb. Members appointed for three-year terms are Christina Caraballo, Tina Esposito, Brad Gescheider, Kensaku Kawamoto, and Sheryl Turney.

The 21st Century Cures Act, enacted in December 2016, established the HIT Advisory Committee and gave the Comptroller General responsibility for appointing several of the  members. The committee will provide recommendations to the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology on policies, standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria relating to the implementation of a health information technology infrastructure that advances the electronic access, exchange, and use of health information.

Brief biographies of the appointees are provided below:

Michael Adcock, MS, RN, FACHE, is Executive Director of the Center for Telehealth at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, which delivers telehealth services across Mississippi.  He works to give telehealth providers access to patients’ medical records and on integrating  telehealth services into these records. He also helped establish a remote patient monitoring program that supports patients managing chronic diseases, such as diabetes or congestive heart failure. Prior to his current position, Mr. Adcock was a pediatric nurse and served in various roles in administration at multiple hospitals. He received his Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Christina Caraballo, MBA, is Director of Healthcare Transformation at Get Real Health, a health information technology development company in Rockville, Maryland, where she develops and implements patient engagement technology solutions and product certification for participation in federal programs. Ms. Caraballo previously worked on federal health policy issues as the Vice President of Government Solutions for Capitol Solutions Group, and as the Director of Health Policy and Advocacy at the Alliance for Patient Advocacy. Ms. Caraballo holds a Master of Business Administration and a Graduate Certificate of Health Information Technology from the George Washington University.

Tina Esposito, MBA, RHIA, FACHE, is the Vice President of Information and Technology Innovation at Advocate Health Care, a hospital network in Illinois. She leads Advocate’s technology innovation activities and has overseen the creation of population health management tools that combine data from numerous sources, including various electronic health record systems, to help improve care efficiency and outcomes. Ms. Esposito received her Master of Business Administration from DePaul University.

Brad Gescheider, MBA, is Senior Director of Provider and Payer Solutions at PatientsLikeMe, a platform where patients can share experiences about their health conditions and connect with others who have similar conditions. His responsibilities include determining ways that patient-reported health data can facilitate interactions between patients, providers, and others to improve health outcomes and manage costs. Mr. Gescheider also serves on the Blue Cross Blue Shield Medical Advisory Board. He received his Master of Business Administration from the University of Southern California.

John Kansky, MBA, MSE, is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Indiana Health Information Exchange, where he is responsible for planning, operations, and financial management. He previously worked as a consultant on health information technology and privacy compliance issues and as a health care Chief Information Officer. Mr. Kansky holds a Master of Business Administration from Indiana University and a Master of Science and Bioengineering from the University of Washington.

Kensaku Kawamoto, MD, PhD, MHS, is Associate Chief Medical Information Officer, University of Utah Health, and Assistant Professor, University of Utah Department of Biomedical Informatics. He conducts research to develop standards-based, interoperable applications and software services to improve health care. He is also a co-chair of the HL7 Clinical Decision Support Work Group, and he founded OpenCDS, a multi-institutional initiative to enable advanced, standards-based, and open-source clinical decision support and electronic clinical quality measurement. Dr. Kawamoto received his degree in medicine, his PhD, and his Master of Health Sciences from Duke University.

Denni McColm, MBA, is the Chief Information Officer at Citizens Memorial Healthcare, a health care network based in Bolivar, Missouri, that includes primary care, acute care, long-term care, home health, and hospice facilities. At Citizens, she is responsible for the adoption and use of an electronic health records system that also serves as a central medical record for patients throughout the surrounding rural community who receive care at facilities outside of Citizens. Ms. McColm received her Master of Business Administration from the University of Missouri.

Brett Oliver, MD, is the Chief Medical Information Officer for Baptist Health, headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, and a practicing part-time family physician with Baptist Family Physicians of Scott County. In his role as Chief Medical Information Officer, he helps ensure that Baptist Health’s information technology systems are designed to meet the needs of staff and patients. Dr. Oliver received his medical degree from the University of Kentucky and completed his residency at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Terrence O’Malley, MD, is a geriatrician at Massachusetts General Hospital and Spaulding Nursing and Therapy Center North End with experience providing care to patients with complex medical needs. He is also an instructor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. O’Malley previously held various administrative leadership positions, including as the Medical Director for Non-acute Care Services at Partners HealthCare and Partners HealthCare at Home. His areas of expertise are in quality measurement and process improvement, systems design, and clinical care, particularly in long-term and post-acute settings. Dr. O’Malley received his medical degree from Cornell University Medical College. 

Carolyn Petersen, MBI, MS, has served as an advocate for patients in various roles since 2002, and is currently Senior Editor for Mayo Clinic’s health information website. Ms. Petersen has served as a patient stakeholder reviewer for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, a patient advocate for the National Cancer Institute, and a consumer representative for an advisory panel at the Food and Drug Administration. Ms. Petersen holds a Master of Biomedical Informatics from the Oregon Health & Science University, and a Master of Science in Exercise and Movement Science from the University of Oregon.

Raj Ratwani, MA, PhD, is Acting Center Director and Scientific Director of the National Center for Human Factors in Healthcare within MedStar Health, and Assistant Professor at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. He conducts research on the usability, safety, and interoperability of health information technology, including ways that software is designed, implemented, and used in health care systems. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow and Research Scientist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Ratwani received his MA and PhD degrees in Human Factors and Applied Cognition from George Mason University.

Sasha TerMaat is a Director at Epic, a health care software company based in Verona, Wisconsin, where she oversees regulatory and quality reporting activities, including implementation of technical standards and software certification. Ms. TerMaat also serves as the Executive Committee Chair for the Electronic Health Records Association. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from St. Olaf College.

Andrew Truscott is a Managing Director for Health and Public Service at Accenture and resides in Houston, Texas. His role includes responsibility for electronic health information management, including appropriate information technology strategy, security, digital architecture, and other related issues. He has also been responsible for the specification and design of electronic health infrastructure for multiple global programs, including security, privacy, confidentiality, and other information governance issues. Mr. Truscott previously served within the United Kingdom’s National Health Service as the Information Governance Director for the National Programme for Information Technology.  He is a graduate of the University of Wales.

Sheryl Turney, MEd, is Senior Director of All-Payer Claims Database Analytics and Data Policy and Administration at Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield and resides in Aliso Viejo, California. At Anthem, she is responsible for the management and use of health data, including compliance with federal and state regulations. She also has worked with stakeholders outside of Anthem, serving on state health information technology advisory committees in Kentucky and Connecticut. Ms. Turney received her Master of Education degree from Cambridge College in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Denise Webb, MA, is Chief Information Officer of Marshfield Clinic Health System and Chief Executive Officer of Marshfield Clinic Information Services, Inc., in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She previously held multiple positions in Wisconsin state government focused on the statewide adoption and use of electronic health records and electronic health information exchange, including as the statewide coordinator for health information technology. Ms. Webb also served in the Air Force, where she retired as a Lieutenant Colonel. She received MA degrees from the U.S. Naval War College and Webster University.

#####

The Government Accountability Office, known as the investigative arm of Congress, is an independent, nonpartisan agency that exists to support Congress in meeting its constitutional responsibilities. GAO also works to improve the performance of the federal government and ensure its accountability to the American people. The agency examines the use of public funds; evaluates federal programs and policies; and provides analyses, recommendations, and other assistance to help Congress make informed oversight, policy, and funding decisions. GAO provides Congress with timely information that is objective, fact-based, nonideological, fair, and balanced. GAO’s commitment to good government is reflected in its core values of accountability, integrity, and reliability.

GAO Makes Appointments to Health Information Technology Advisory Committee

WASHINGTON, D.C. (August 3, 2017) — Gene L. Dodaro, Comptroller General of the United States and head of the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), today announced 15 appointments to the new Health Information Technology (HIT) Advisory Committee.

“It is extremely valuable to have a range of perspectives and expertise in helping the government address challenges related to health information technology,” Dodaro said. “GAO received nominations for many highly qualified individuals, and I’m pleased to announce this first round of appointments to the HIT Advisory Committee.”

Newly appointed members will serve for one-, two-, or three-year terms. All members may be reappointed for subsequent three-year terms. Members appointed for one-year terms are Michael Adcock, Terrence O’Malley, Carolyn Petersen, Sasha TerMaat, and Andrew Truscott. Members appointed for two-year terms are John Kansky, Denni McColm, Brett Oliver, Raj Ratwani, and Denise Webb. Members appointed for three-year terms are Christina Caraballo, Tina Esposito, Brad Gescheider, Kensaku Kawamoto, and Sheryl Turney.

The 21st Century Cures Act, enacted in December 2016, established the HIT Advisory Committee and gave the Comptroller General responsibility for appointing several of the  members. The committee will provide recommendations to the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology on policies, standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria relating to the implementation of a health information technology infrastructure that advances the electronic access, exchange, and use of health information.

Brief biographies of the appointees are provided below:

Michael Adcock, MS, RN, FACHE, is Executive Director of the Center for Telehealth at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, which delivers telehealth services across Mississippi.  He works to give telehealth providers access to patients’ medical records and on integrating  telehealth services into these records. He also helped establish a remote patient monitoring program that supports patients managing chronic diseases, such as diabetes or congestive heart failure. Prior to his current position, Mr. Adcock was a pediatric nurse and served in various roles in administration at multiple hospitals. He received his Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Christina Caraballo, MBA, is Director of Healthcare Transformation at Get Real Health, a health information technology development company in Rockville, Maryland, where she develops and implements patient engagement technology solutions and product certification for participation in federal programs. Ms. Caraballo previously worked on federal health policy issues as the Vice President of Government Solutions for Capitol Solutions Group, and as the Director of Health Policy and Advocacy at the Alliance for Patient Advocacy. Ms. Caraballo holds a Master of Business Administration and a Graduate Certificate of Health Information Technology from the George Washington University.

Tina Esposito, MBA, RHIA, FACHE, is the Vice President of Information and Technology Innovation at Advocate Health Care, a hospital network in Illinois. She leads Advocate’s technology innovation activities and has overseen the creation of population health management tools that combine data from numerous sources, including various electronic health record systems, to help improve care efficiency and outcomes. Ms. Esposito received her Master of Business Administration from DePaul University.

Brad Gescheider, MBA, is Senior Director of Provider and Payer Solutions at PatientsLikeMe, a platform where patients can share experiences about their health conditions and connect with others who have similar conditions. His responsibilities include determining ways that patient-reported health data can facilitate interactions between patients, providers, and others to improve health outcomes and manage costs. Mr. Gescheider also serves on the Blue Cross Blue Shield Medical Advisory Board. He received his Master of Business Administration from the University of Southern California.

John Kansky, MBA, MSE, is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Indiana Health Information Exchange, where he is responsible for planning, operations, and financial management. He previously worked as a consultant on health information technology and privacy compliance issues and as a health care Chief Information Officer. Mr. Kansky holds a Master of Business Administration from Indiana University and a Master of Science and Bioengineering from the University of Washington.

Kensaku Kawamoto, MD, PhD, MHS, is Associate Chief Medical Information Officer, University of Utah Health, and Assistant Professor, University of Utah Department of Biomedical Informatics. He conducts research to develop standards-based, interoperable applications and software services to improve health care. He is also a co-chair of the HL7 Clinical Decision Support Work Group, and he founded OpenCDS, a multi-institutional initiative to enable advanced, standards-based, and open-source clinical decision support and electronic clinical quality measurement. Dr. Kawamoto received his degree in medicine, his PhD, and his Master of Health Sciences from Duke University.

Denni McColm, MBA, is the Chief Information Officer at Citizens Memorial Healthcare, a health care network based in Bolivar, Missouri, that includes primary care, acute care, long-term care, home health, and hospice facilities. At Citizens, she is responsible for the adoption and use of an electronic health records system that also serves as a central medical record for patients throughout the surrounding rural community who receive care at facilities outside of Citizens. Ms. McColm received her Master of Business Administration from the University of Missouri.

Brett Oliver, MD, is the Chief Medical Information Officer for Baptist Health, headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, and a practicing part-time family physician with Baptist Family Physicians of Scott County. In his role as Chief Medical Information Officer, he helps ensure that Baptist Health’s information technology systems are designed to meet the needs of staff and patients. Dr. Oliver received his medical degree from the University of Kentucky and completed his residency at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Terrence O’Malley, MD, is a geriatrician at Massachusetts General Hospital and Spaulding Nursing and Therapy Center North End with experience providing care to patients with complex medical needs. He is also an instructor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. O’Malley previously held various administrative leadership positions, including as the Medical Director for Non-acute Care Services at Partners HealthCare and Partners HealthCare at Home. His areas of expertise are in quality measurement and process improvement, systems design, and clinical care, particularly in long-term and post-acute settings. Dr. O’Malley received his medical degree from Cornell University Medical College. 

Carolyn Petersen, MBI, MS, has served as an advocate for patients in various roles since 2002, and is currently Senior Editor for Mayo Clinic’s health information website. Ms. Petersen has served as a patient stakeholder reviewer for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, a patient advocate for the National Cancer Institute, and a consumer representative for an advisory panel at the Food and Drug Administration. Ms. Petersen holds a Master of Biomedical Informatics from the Oregon Health & Science University, and a Master of Science in Exercise and Movement Science from the University of Oregon.

Raj Ratwani, MA, PhD, is Acting Center Director and Scientific Director of the National Center for Human Factors in Healthcare within MedStar Health, and Assistant Professor at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. He conducts research on the usability, safety, and interoperability of health information technology, including ways that software is designed, implemented, and used in health care systems. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow and Research Scientist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Ratwani received his MA and PhD degrees in Human Factors and Applied Cognition from George Mason University.

Sasha TerMaat is a Director at Epic, a health care software company based in Verona, Wisconsin, where she oversees regulatory and quality reporting activities, including implementation of technical standards and software certification. Ms. TerMaat also serves as the Executive Committee Chair for the Electronic Health Records Association. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from St. Olaf College.

Andrew Truscott is a Managing Director for Health and Public Service at Accenture and resides in Houston, Texas. His role includes responsibility for electronic health information management, including appropriate information technology strategy, security, digital architecture, and other related issues. He has also been responsible for the specification and design of electronic health infrastructure for multiple global programs, including security, privacy, confidentiality, and other information governance issues. Mr. Truscott previously served within the United Kingdom’s National Health Service as the Information Governance Director for the National Programme for Information Technology.  He is a graduate of the University of Wales.

Sheryl Turney, MEd, is Senior Director of All-Payer Claims Database Analytics and Data Policy and Administration at Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield and resides in Aliso Viejo, California. At Anthem, she is responsible for the management and use of health data, including compliance with federal and state regulations. She also has worked with stakeholders outside of Anthem, serving on state health information technology advisory committees in Kentucky and Connecticut. Ms. Turney received her Master of Education degree from Cambridge College in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Denise Webb, MA, is Chief Information Officer of Marshfield Clinic Health System and Chief Executive Officer of Marshfield Clinic Information Services, Inc., in Marshfield, Wisconsin. She previously held multiple positions in Wisconsin state government focused on the statewide adoption and use of electronic health records and electronic health information exchange, including as the statewide coordinator for health information technology. Ms. Webb also served in the Air Force, where she retired as a Lieutenant Colonel. She received MA degrees from the U.S. Naval War College and Webster University.

#####

The Government Accountability Office, known as the investigative arm of Congress, is an independent, nonpartisan agency that exists to support Congress in meeting its constitutional responsibilities. GAO also works to improve the performance of the federal government and ensure its accountability to the American people. The agency examines the use of public funds; evaluates federal programs and policies; and provides analyses, recommendations, and other assistance to help Congress make informed oversight, policy, and funding decisions. GAO provides Congress with timely information that is objective, fact-based, nonideological, fair, and balanced. GAO’s commitment to good government is reflected in its core values of accountability, integrity, and reliability.

Press Kit: Income, Poverty & Health Insurance

Trudi Renwick, Assistant Division Chief, Social, Economic and Housing Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau

“En general, los ingresos de los hogares a la escala nacional aumentaron según nuevos datos de la Oficina del Censo. Entre 2015 y 2016, la mediana real de ingreso de hogares aumento por 3.2 por ciento a $59,000. Esto fue un aumento de aproximadamente $1,800 por hogar. Por el segundo año consecutivo, hubo un aumento en la mediana de ingreso de los hogares mantenidos por blancos no hispanos, negros e hispanos. Mientras los cambios año a año el ingreso mediano ingreso para los hogares mantenidos por asiáticos no fueron estadísticamente significativos, desde 2014, los ingresos medianos para estos hogares aumentaron 8.1 por ciento.”

Ingresos, Pobreza y Seguro de Salud Cobertura: 2016

http://nonprofitchurchconsulting.com/tag/washington-non-profit-consulting/ 12 de septiembre de 2017 — La Oficina del Censo de los EE.UU. publicó hoy que la mediana real de ingreso de los hogares aumentó en 3.2 por ciento entre 2015 y 2016, mientras que la tasa oficial de pobreza del país disminuyó 0.8 puntos porcentuales. Al mismo tiempo, hubo un descenso en el porcentaje de personas sin cobertura de seguro médico.

La mediana de ingreso de los hogares en los Estados Unidos en el 2016 fue $59,039, un aumento de 3.2 por ciento en términos reales en comparación con la mediana de ingreso en 2015 de $57,230. Este es el segundo año consecutivo que hubo un aumento en la mediana de ingreso de los hogares.

La tasa oficial de pobreza del país en 2016 era del 12.7 por ciento, con 40.6 millones de personas que vivían en la pobreza, 2.5 millones menos que en 2015.   El descenso de 0.8 puntos porcentuales de 2015 al 2016 representa una reducción de pobreza por el segundo año consecutivo.  La tasa de pobreza en 2016 no fue estadísticamente diferente a la tasa de 2007 (12.5 por ciento), el año antes de la recesión más reciente.

El porcentaje de personas sin cobertura de seguro médico para todo el año calendario de 2016 fue 8.8 por ciento, un descenso de 9.1 por ciento en 2015.  El número de personas sin cobertura de seguro médico disminuyó a 28.1 millones de 29.0 millones durante el período.

Estos resultados se encuentran en dos informes: Ingreso y Pobreza en los Estados Unidos: 2016 y Cobertura de Seguro Médico en los Estados Unidos: 2016. El informe este año conmemora el quincuagésimo aniversario de los primeros estimados de pobreza publicado por la Oficina del Censo en la serie de informes de la Encuesta Continua de Población.

Otro informe de la Oficina del Censo, La Medida Suplementaria de Pobreza: 2016 también fue publicado hoy.  La tasa suplementaria de pobreza en 2016 fue http://thermograve.co.uk/2015/11/ 14.0 por ciento, un descenso de 14.5 en 2015.  Con el apoyo de la Oficina de Estadísticas Laborales de los EE.UU., la Medida Suplementaria de Pobreza demuestra otra manera de medir la tasa de pobreza en los Estados Unidos y sirve como un indicador adicional del bienestar económico. La Oficina del Censo ha publicado estimados de pobreza usando esta medida suplementaria anualmente desde 2011.

La Encuesta Continua de Población, patrocinada conjuntamente por la Oficina del Censo de los EE. UU.  y la Oficina de Estadísticas Laborales de los EE. UU., se lleva a cabo cada mes y es la principal fuente de estadísticas de la fuerza laboral para la población de los EE. UU.; esta encuesta se usa para calcular los estimados mensuales de la tasa de desempleo.  Los suplementos se añaden la mayoría de los meses; el cuestionario del Suplemento Anual Social y Económico está diseñado para producir estimados nacionales anuales sobre ingresos, pobreza y seguro de salud. El más reciente Suplemento Anual Social y Económico se realizó a nivel nacional y se recopiló información sobre ingresos y cobertura de seguro médico durante el año calendario 2016.

El informe de ingreso y pobreza basado en la Encuesta Continua de Población incluye comparaciones con un año anterior y tablas históricas en el informe contienen estadísticas desde el año 1959. El informe de cobertura de seguro médico está basado en la Encuesta Continua de Población y la Encuesta sobre la Comunidad Estadounidense.   Los estimados de pobreza e ingreso para los estados y áreas locales estarán disponibles el jueves, 14 de septiembre, basados en la Encuesta sobre la Comunidad Estadounidense.

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the U.S.: 2016

http://rg-onlinesolutions.co.uk/tag/4s/feed/ SEPT. 12, 2017 — The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that real median household income increased by 3.2 percent between 2015 and 2016, while the official poverty rate decreased 0.8 percentage points. At the same time, the percentage of people without health insurance coverage decreased.

Median household income in the United States in 2016 was $59,039, an increase in real terms of 3.2 percent from the 2015 median income of $57,230. This is the second consecutive annual increase in median household income.

The nation’s official poverty rate in 2016 was 12.7 percent, with 40.6 million people in poverty, 2.5 million fewer than in 2015. The 0.8 percentage point decrease from 2015 to 2016 represents the second consecutive annual decline in poverty. The 2016 poverty rate is not statistically different from the 2007 rate (12.5 percent), the year before the most recent recession.

The percentage of people without health insurance coverage for the entire 2016 calendar year was 8.8 percent, down from 9.1 percent in 2015. The number of people without health insurance declined to 28.1 million from 29.0 million over the period.

These findings are contained in two reports: Income and Poverty in the United States: 2016 and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2016. This year’s income and poverty report marks the 50th anniversary of the first poverty estimates released by the Census Bureau in the Current Population report series.

Another Census Bureau report, The Supplemental Poverty Measure: 2016, was also released today. The supplemental poverty rate in 2016 was 14.0 percent, a decrease from 14.5 percent in 2015. With support from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Supplemental Poverty Measure shows a different way of measuring poverty in the United States and serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being. The Census Bureau has published poverty estimates using the supplemental poverty measure annually since 2011.

The Current Population Survey, sponsored jointly by the Census Bureau and Bureau of Labor Statistics, is conducted every month and is the primary source of labor force statistics for the U.S. population; it is used to calculate the monthly unemployment rate estimates. Supplements are added in most months; the Annual Social and Economic Supplement questionnaire is designed to give annual, national estimates of income, poverty and health insurance numbers and rates. The most recent Annual Social and Economic Supplement was conducted nationwide and collected information about income and health insurance coverage during the 2016 calendar year.

The Current Population Survey-based income and poverty report includes comparisons with the previous year and historical tables in the report contain statistics back to 1959. The health insurance report is based on both the Current Population Survey and the American Community Survey. State and local income, poverty and health insurance estimates will be released Thursday, Sept. 14, from the American Community Survey.

Startup Firms Created Over 2 Million Jobs in 2015

SEPT. 20, 2017 — In 2015, the nation’s 414,000 startup firms created 2.5 million new jobs according to data from the Census Bureau’s Business Dynamics Statistics. In contrast, this level of startup activity is well below the pre-Great Recession average of 524,000 startup firms and 3.3 million new jobs per year for the period 2002-2006.

Other highlights include:

  • Job creation in the United States totaled 16.8 million with job destruction equaling 13.7 million. Job creation minus job destruction equaled net job creation of 3.1 million in 2015.
  • Young firms (those less than 6 years old) accounted for 11 percent of employment and 27 percent of job creation.
  • Old firms (those more than 25 years old) comprised 62 percent of employment and 48 percent of job creation.
  • The job creation rate for young firms, excluding startups, was 20 percent in 2015. This rate is above the Great Recession low of 15 percent in 2009, and it has recovered to its average level of 20 percent during the period 2002-2006.
  • The net job creation rate for establishments in metro areas was 2.7 percent. For establishments in nonmetro areas, the rate was lower at 1.2 percent.
  • States with the highest net job creation rates in 2015 — 3.4 percent and above — are in the South Atlantic, Pacific and Mountain divisions. There were significant differences in net job creation rates at the state level, ranging from about 5 percent to just below 0 percent.